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 JULY 2020 ONLINE AWARDS

Next event: 6th May 2021
St Mary’s Church, Nottingham

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Online Awards 2020

To recognise the talent of the 2020 3rd year fashion and textile students, who would have ordinarily taken part in the event earlier this year, Fashanne hosted 2 x ONLINE AWARDS.

Unfortunately we could not hold the awards event in April 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic, yet we are thrilled to have a date to look forward to next year – please put 6th May 2021 in your diaries!

The 2 Online Awards: “The Judge’s Choice Award” and “The People’s Choice Award”.

Please find the student’s entries below displayed within the 8 categories. Images of the student’s designs along with their concept is shown here.

*VOTING for The People’s Choice Award  has now closed.*

Our panel of Judges have viewed the students’ work online and have provided individual feedback for “The Judge’s Choice Award”, the overall winner was a combined decision from across all the categories.

PRIZES The two winners will receive a Fashanne 2020 Certficate, £100 and a VIP opportunity to showcase their work at next year’s Fashanne event.

RESULTS  The Online Awards film is now live and can be viewed below. The film showcases all the students’ designs, the Judges comments and of course the 2 winners hosted by our founder BBC’s Anne Davies.

Virtual Fashanne Awards 2020

Winner of the Judge’s Choice Award

Congratulations to Ciara Pontin from Nottingham Trent University.

Winner of the People’s Choice Award

Congratulations to Nicole Stavrou from De Montfort University with a massive total of 9335 votes!

Athleisure Design

Clarissa Fritsch

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

“MILK“ is about the fear of the uncertainty what’s underwater this phenomenon is called Thalassophobia. Which is an intense and persistent fear of the sea. I developed that fear, because of a trauma I experienced as a child.

The collection is a process that goes through several phases.

Each phase is inspired by different functional clothing. With the help of conventional processing techniques that are typical for the respective functional clothing, an outfit suitable for each phase was created, to provide the wearer with the functions I need to feel safe in the water. This process is supposed to symbolize the cure of the phobia over time.

Moritz Jahn

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

This collection is about my personal experiences with homophobia and can be regarded as a reappraisal of my infancy in a small town. I consulted impressions from my childhood as well as findings from my thesis about the social construct of masculinity, homophobia and heterosexism. Thereby, vulnerability and retreat represent the central feeling in which this collection finds its origin.

The very loose fit provides a special comfort zone; physically and also mentally, because it disguises the body shape and creates anonymity. Also, a variety of traditional and digital prints can be found in the collection which are inspired by fantastic childhood memories, emotional feelings, and male domains.

Felicity Dodson

De Montfort University
BA Contour Fashion

Taking a futuristic lens to the athleisure industry, this project pushes the boundaries of design with garments that effortlessly move between day and night. During the day, these hardworking pieces incorporate workout equipment into the collection by having a built-in resistance band on the joggers, located in the pocket gliding effortlessly around the legs, and with elastic running down the back of the leggings to add muscle resistance when walking. At night, they reflect unique high-vis elements. This duality pushes the boundaries of what is deemed ‘sustainable’, reducing the overall manufacturing footprint by incorporating more than one element in each piece.

Elvira Isenzhulova

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Design

Inspired by Bridget Riley’s optical art and a personal interest in creating movement in knit, I have produced a garment that uses knitted structures to support, shape and enhance the body like a corset but is soft and comfortable enough to wear.

A combination of engineered knit and shaping underwear inspired my approach which saw me utilising 3D development methods, such as draping and deconstruction to create unique, transformable shapes. This garment offers a functional and directional choice that bridges the gap between sportswear and formalwear, creating a versatile and interchangeable look within one outfit.

Oluwanifemi Duyilemi

University of Northampton
BA Fashion Design

I am creating a womenswear collection, that focuses on empowering and allowing comfort to the individual. My creative and contemporary design direction is looking at the mind, body and healing and showcases using crystal as a form of healing. My colour pallet is grey, pink, brown, nude.

The colours are taken from my research. I have decided to use pink as a highlight colour in my collection as it was taken from the exhibition I attended called “misbehaving bodies”. My work 2 focuses on body positivity and awareness. Because I am aware of mental and physical health, I have added element that the allow the person wearing my garment to be able to adjust and detach due to their own comfort and preference. I would be using material such as silk, nappa leather, jersey, scuba mesh and polyester satin.

These materials allow me to mould and drape around the body. The silhouette of my work is taken from the shapes from crystals. I am making 3D shapes, oversized jackets, hoodies and tracksuit bottom but making the more structed.

George Paul

University of Northampton
Footwear & Accessories

Skateboarding has been a part of my life from a young age and throughout this project I would dive deep into this culture to see how it all started. Looking and searching through magazines and footage I was able to find various amounts of media to help me. Figures such as Jakes Phelps and Mark Gonzalez inspired me within the design of the shoes as the silhouette would fit their era of skating. My shoes feature leather protective panels that will change colour once they have been skated in and on one shoe a rubber drip to represent graffiti dripping.

Emily Moody

Nottingham Trent University
BA Fashion Design

Sisterhood. The sporting world has been a predominantly male dominated world in the past, leaving women in sport somewhat marginalised. ‘Sisterhood’ explores the ways in which women have pushed for change, making gender equality in sports more prevalent today. I have taken inspiration from visual research including powerful sportswomen, female football fans, football chants and retro sports kits, as well as my dissertation research on the link between women and ‘athleisure’. I have then explored this through collaging, drawing, 3D sampling and pattern cutting, creating a collection that empowers sportswomen and their ‘sisterhood’ that is valued hugely in today’s society.

Madison Raynor

Nottingham Trent University
Fashion design BA hons

My concept is called “cybernated kingdom” which is based around the fast past technological environment of the city. I wanted to create a collection that was seasonless and that contained items from workwear, gym, and everyday garments. I wanted to use colour and print to enhance items of clothing but in addition to mirror the idea of technology. My knowledge of sportswear allows me to understand what is already out there in the industry and what is missing. It was my mission to create a disruptive forward-thinking collection that would push all boundaries of activewear.

Commercial Design

Catherine Fletcher

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

‘A GOLDMINE OF A COALMINE’, is inspired by the mining town of Coalville in North West Leicestershire. The town has been my family’s home for generations, some of whom worked in the mines; therefore, I want the collection to showcase the town’s former glory, my family and its rich history. The concept focuses on the coal mining industry which caused the expansion and the name of the town as well as another famous company, Palitoy, a toy manufacturer that had their factory in the town and produced Star Wars figurines, dolls and an abundance of other toys.

Lauren Smith

University of Derby
Textile Design

‘Bugs in Bloom,’ reflects the unseen beauty of nature, inspired by insects and florals, this printed fashion collection demonstrates organic beauty. Incorporating intuitive design and large-scale, insects are transformed into wearable designs which are quirky and fun to wear, giving the collection a dress up and down appeal.

Sunstone is a small part of the range ‘Bugs in Bloom.’ By complimenting garments through the use of fun eye-catching branding, matching labels and packaging, this promotion is appropriate for the sale of ‘Lauren Mae Designs’ high-end high-street fashion. This creates a unique luxury appeal for the summer range ‘Bugs in Bloom.’

Abi Harris

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Buying with Design

This collection is a sustainable unisex range for Lazy Oaf titled ‘Love our Oceans’. It addresses UN Goal 14: Life Below Water and has longer lasting teaching effects of our future generations. The collection collaborates with The Ocean Clean Up and a percentage of the profits go to the charity. This range is designed to educate children by offering a light-hearted, but genuine message to future generations about the importance of clean oceans and plastic pollution through the use of fun and playful prints, motifs and slogans. The collection is made using a range of organic and sustainable materials.

Maddie Johnson

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Buying with Design

Mini Madi is a brand inspired by the rise of online shopping, children’s sustainable fashion and the power of social media. The brand offers clothing and accessories for ages one to six. Most garments are made from organic, recycled or responsibly sourced materials and components. The pieces are timeless, versatile and designed to grow with the child. The Autumn/Winter 20/21 collection is in collaboration with The Bucket List Family. Inspired by their love for the environment and their minimalistic travelling wardrobe that holds only sustainable essentials, the ‘Mini-Malist’ travel range is ideal for a travel wardrobe and the general market.

Rebekah Theobald-Brown

University of Northampton
Textiles for Fashion

My FMP is about the waste and pollution caused by the fashion and leather industry, solely looking at the waste caused. I have focused my project on recycling leather scraps from our onsite tannery (The ICLT Institute for Creative Leather Technologies) in which solves the issue of the waste produced there. Combing my textiles skills and my expanding knowledge on leather I have begun to create beautifully handmade samples which I have developed into stand out products.

From using a creative hand dyed technique, cutting and weaving pieces together to hand printed flock and foil to create dimension there is a complete journey behind each piece. Using shades teals and browns as my main colour pallet to contrast with the shine of the lead and gold foils and white flock to create texture. Also, with handmade leather labels that are print with foil and/or laser cut in varying sizes to give them a unique identity.

Halima Shigdar

University of Northampton
Fashion Design

Starting by looking into the ideas behind an illegal street racer and the motive behind their actions. The Midnight Club, the infamous street racers were my biggest inspiration; as all the secrets unfold behind the masked racers. My concept inspired the choice of heavy weight fabrics such as cotton drill and inner tubes, from looking at real life racing uniforms and the fabrics used. The shapes of the tyres to the smoke that comes out of the exhaust pipe to inspire my silhouettes. My concept fits the commercial category as the trends of today are fit around this oversized, carefree look.

Amber Jones

Nottingham Trent University
BA Hons textile design

BEAM ME UP! Taking inspiration from natural botanical imagery, made into an oriental style due to the garment silhouettes. Beam Me Up is a luxurious Spring/Summer womenswear collection, designed to provide escape from the mundane through large scale placement pattern in a maximalist style. This escape is created through the reference of foreign climes and explores the human instinct of wanderlust (having a strong desire to travel). The designs are bought to life through immense detail in the process of hand drawing and other illustrative techniques.

Janine Curcher

Nottingham Trent University
BA (hons) Fashion Design

X Celsius Above is a versatile sportswear range focused on the element of heat, taking influence from the Australian outback and other desert events. The range explores themes of urban adventure and desert survival through hot climates using breathable knits and UV protective fabrics. Having a mixture of comfortable and technical garments allows wearers to mix and match with functional elements that allow accessories to be attached to garments using straps and hook clasps. The range uses topography prints inspired by heat maps and bold colours taken from the orange Australian sands which is carried throughout the branding of the products.

Footwear & Accessory Design

Hannah Davies

University of Derby
Textile Design BA

My designs have been inspired by my university project, The Celestial Cerulean collection. This collection has been inspired by my research into Saint Petersburg Mosque in Russia due to its rich and vibrant colours and intricate tiled pattern surrounding the domes.

The collection features 2020 trend colours and shapes inspired by the domes and features of multiple mosques which has led to me creating my own shapes and repeated designs.

I worked on designs that fitted together and sat well as a collection, whilst using various shades of blues and teals to create a satisfying clash of pattern for bold and daring fabrics for individual statement pieces.

I enjoy working with various textures and sectors of textile design, but for these accessories I feel knit has proven successful to add texture.

Lydia Fisher

University of Derby
Textile Design

The duo of clutch bags was inspired by shape and texture. The clutch bags are handwoven on a 16 shaft Harris table top loom using thick yarns and a mixture of other materials including magazine pages and salvage cuttings from the edge of Bonus Jacquard samples. This has made the bags sustainably conscious. The material contains various woven textures that make the bags the perfect accessories to brighten up any dull outfit. The bag interior is made out of 100% cotton fabric that is printed with various colourful shapes with a grey background.

Heemin Choi

De Montfort University
BA (Hons) Footwear Design

The Tripitaka Koreana is the world’s most comprehensive and oldest version of Buddhist scriptures, written in Hanja script. These scriptures are central to the cultural heritage of Korea. The Tripikata characters are carved from wooden blocks and used like stamps to decorate the body with ink. Inspired by this principle, these exquisite characters are expressed in the heel of my footwear and are embedded as a design feature. Personalising the item, I chose to use the consonant of my last name. There are further personalised motifs secretly hidden on the shoe: my name is engraved like a stamp using laser cutting on the outer sole.

Han Park

De Montfort University
BA (Hons) Footwear Design

The atmosphere of Africa is wild but pure and beautiful. One special attraction of African culture is the Dinka Corset, created by the Dinka tribe in South Sudan. They use raw materials such as hand-made twines and sharpened branches or animal bones to make the corset.

The most distinctive element of my Dinka shoe is the moulding technique, which emphasizes the unique feeling of Africa. By moulding plastic and leather parts, I wanted to give the Dinka Corset the feel of the vertebrae. I used mid-tone colours in the style to provide a contrast with the black and white.

Anna Melegh

University of Northampton
Footwear and Accessories

The bug designer. Fashion has the power to highlight various issues, and my goal is to raise awareness of the conservation of the natural world.

I am fascinated by the natural world, in particular varieties of bugs, butterflies and the habits they live in.

According to recent studies, “the world’s insects are hurtling down the path to extinction, threatening a catastrophic collapse of nature’s ecosystems. The extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles. The total mass of insects is falling by a precipitous 2.5% a year, suggesting they could vanish within a century” (Carrington, 2019).

Maisie Thompson

University of Northampton
Footwear and Accessories Design

My final major project revolves around a poem titled ‘The Pig That Flew’. I wrote the poem as a device to articulate my experience as a working-class woman of colour and how that has provided navigation for how I approach my future. The nostalgic nature of my concept has allowed me to lean into the whimsy of a daydream, whilst also staying grounded in the realism that has been bred into anyone who endured a less than picture-perfect childhood. This juxtaposition became prevalent in my design process as I consistently paired high-end stylings with streetwear to promote the idea of equal opportunity and value bestowed on all classes of people.

Hollie Brown

Nottingham Trent University
Fashion accessory design

Longevity and permanence is the key theme within my project. I want my designs to be able to sustain for as long as possible. Taking inspiration from ancient craftmanship and architecture, my key research point came from the forbidden city in Beijing, which has remained a permanent man-made site on our planet for 600 years. Inside its grounds it boasts extremely intricate wooden framed buildings and intensely detailed artwork, that’s both colourful and extensive through-out. The concept of longevity that these buildings embody, inspired my project alongside the elaborate joinery of traditional Asian architecture and artwork.

Rosie Wells

Nottingham Trent University
BA Fashion Accessory Design

I started my research by looking into different interpretations of armour, in buildings, nature and for protection. My research then developed into the theme of exoskeletal, and looking at different areas of protection and barriers. Looking further into different elements of protection I researched into traditional knotting to make fenders to protect boats, and traditional leather braiding techniques. I took inspiration from gun and knife holsters to design accessory pieces on the body, as I wanted the pieces in my collection to act like a layer of protection to the wearer. From this research I gathered shapes, patterns and a colour pallet to take forward into my own designs.

Knitwear Design

Georgina Knight

University of Derby
Textile Design BA (Hons)

My graduate collection ‘Azulejos e Cabos’, translates to ‘tiles and cables’. It follows on from the theme of Portuguese tiles in my pre-collection, with the investigation of other religious tiling during my visit to St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice and Durham Cathedral. I developed experimental design structures, exploring the wonders of cabling and geometric shapes inspired by these tiles. Designs were centred around cabling techniques, contrasting colours, texture, and structure. The vibrant colour palette updates the traditional imagery of the muted, old-fashioned tiling, injecting a contemporary fresh look to the collection.

Nicole Stavrou

De Montfort University
Textiles Design BA (Hons)

Be who you are, embrace your differences: One in four people suffer from mental health, which may change the way they view the world. My knitwear collection utilises optical illusions to represent an individual’s uniqueness. The overall aim of this collection is to highlight these issues.

Experimenting with mathematical structured knits and a range of yarns to create bold and complex structures based on the optical illusions; I have created designs that represent people’s differences in the society we live in.

Elizabeth Walecki

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Textile Design

Principles of Science and Dress: Matter, Form and Motion. Placing the body amidst the language of science was the catalyst for the collection. Simplifying the principle states of matter into solid, liquid and gas, determines the structural elements of the knitted outcomes. Similar to the unaware entropic changes within our environment, we too are unmindful of the significance of the relation between our body and fabric, and what form follows because of it. Our relationship with our clothes, once worn, are reshaped through movement, being stretched, washed and worn, never truly returning to its prior state. Like elemental collisions, two elements colliding is unpredictable and never truly repeatable.

Stira Ibrahim

University of Northampton
Textiles for fashion

This concept is inspired by multi-cultural children .It explores senses of identity and Concept is inspired by multicultural children. It explores senses of identity and belonging and how this affects their social wellbeing. This is a children’s wear collection with a strong drive towards sustainability. Extensive research was carried out into the traditional natural dyeing techniques related to Kurdish-Syrian heritage. Sage, Camomile, Hibiscus, Indigo, Cochineal and Madder, were used for colour and Alum as mordant to fix it. Exploration into mixing ingredients resulted in a wide range of vivid colours on a variety of natural fibres to include wool and cotton. Hand dyeing using tie-dye technique allowed to create unique patterns and free hand applique embroidery inspired by a photo of my daughter who is both British –Kurdish used to obtain interesting textures. All threads were used 100% cotton and were naturally dyed.

Erin Doyle

Nottingham Trent University
BA (hons)Fashion Knitwear and Knitted Textile Design

Oh, Sweet Nostalgia’ is inspired by my grandparent’s house, which for a time in my childhood, was also my home. They live in a very 70s home, cluttered with trinkets, flowers and photographs. My grandparents’ house has always been my safe haven and only place that really feels like home to me. Delving into old photographs and memories, I looked at details to inspire colour and pattern, translating them into knitted fabrics using laying in, mock rib and jacquard. I was also inspired by my grandfather’s flourishing garden, which I translated into floral knitted fabrics.

Ashira Mellor

Nottingham Trent University
BA (hons)Fashion Knitwear Design and Knitted Textiles

The Traveller’ has been inspired from personal experience travelling abroad, embracing a diverse range of cultures whilst appreciating the various aesthetics from country to country.

The menswear collection explores the idea of travelling round the world with just the items you can carry on your back, without the need for wanting more. Uniquely lending itself to a trans-seasonal collection, with endless outfit combinations.

Garments within the collection explore multi-functionality, durability and the need for longevity. By giving more purpose to a garment or item there becomes more attachment and less chance of it being discarded. This being the ultimate goal.

Menswear Design

Moritz Jahn

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

This collection is about my personal experiences with homophobia and can be regarded as a reappraisal of my infancy in a small town. I consulted impressions from my childhood as well as findings from my thesis about the social construct of masculinity, homophobia and heterosexism. Thereby, vulnerability and retreat represent the central feeling in which this collection finds its origin.

The very loose fit provides a special comfort zone; physically and also mentally, because it disguises the body shape and creates anonymity. Also, a variety of traditional and digital prints can be found in the collection which are inspired by fantastic childhood memories, emotional feelings, and male domains.

Nicole Szlavik

University of Derby
BA (hons) Fashion

Dear Fashion, ‘I’M WORRIED ABOUT YOU’

AW 2021, Zero waste, Menswear

Fashion Blogger Masha Sedgwick truthfully wrote ‘Dear Fashion, I‘m worried about you.‘

The fashion industry exploits its worker, destroys the environment and creates vast amounts of waste. Brands are only slowly changing, as I enter the fashion industry, I want to set an example of sustainability and zero waste.

A big inspiration is the Pattern and Decoration Movement of the 1970s, their mostly colourful and often seemingly random prints.

With this collection, I want to raise awareness about the problems a consumer-based society causes and how we can all do our bit to help resolve those problems.

Katie Cornock

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Design

The ‘Working-Class Heroes’ collection explores the tensions between government policies and how the working class in Britain are affected by them. A clash of athleisure and classic menswear, it explores the concept of ‘being proud to be British’ and how this might resonate with society today. 70s and 80s themes such as Thatcher’s Britain, the North/South divide, football culture, and the Windrush generation, infuse this collection and inform the development of its silhouette and the use of bold primary colours. The project celebrates the tireless battles that many minority groups have faced and overcome and depicts strength in solidarity.

Abi Lewer

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Design

Exploring the relationship between mental health and the fashion industry, “I’M A WORK IN PROGRESS” is a four-outfit Spring/Summer 2021 collection that reflects emotions without the need for words. Mental health’s often not spoken about, and when it is, it’s hard to define in language. My experience of anxiety and depression informs the collection and can be seen in the interplay between order and disorder. It’s expressed through the displacement of tailoring combined with creative pattern cutting explored in a range of fabrics and prints. It’s hoped the themes reflected will resonate with other young people suffering with mental health.

Simon Hazell

University of Northampton
BA Fashion

My concept is based on my family’s history with WWII. My grandfather, Barrington Robert Hazell was a prisoner of war held in Poland. I wanted to research his story, one that he didn’t tell when he was alive. I have pulled information and key pieces from these and created initial visual research to aid in designing my collection. I have spent a lot of time looking at old photographs, looking at war records and speaking to my grandfather’s friends. The main source of information was his own writings, ones that we only found after he had died.

Marium Mahmood

University of Northampton
BA (Hons) Fashion

Investigating the sick mind of Ed Gein. Taking elements from his life and applying it into my collection.

Ed Gein upcycled body parts into furniture, giving me the idea to upcycling old garments and reconstructed them. Going to charity shops and buying multiple jackets and trousers to modernise into my inventive ideas. Using tailoring techniques to make the garment fitted in the right areas using darts and tiding up each edge with trimmings.

The print style is inspirited by the British urban culture that has become populated over the years expressing emotions and stories.

Katherine Channell

Nottingham Trent University
Fashion Design BA Hons

The concept of this collection focuses on elitist partying. The Riot Club, the movie and Bullingdon Club became the main focus. My collection’s look represents the drunk persona of these highclass parties, focusing on mixing the tight fitting traditional tailoring style with oversized and loose silhouettes. These two outfits from my collection contain a traditional crest print exposing their drunken antics through the British style. Outfit 1 references back to the Bullingdon boy’s tailcoats. The fabrics in outfit 2 show the high-class environment mixed with the school stripe idea and the exposure of the headlines shown with the see-through waistcoat.

Saskia Purr

Nottingham Trent University
Fashion Design

LOTUS IN A SEA OF FIRE. My collection concept developed from my interest in political and religious contradictions, using Buddhism as a starting point. I discovered news articles documenting a militant group of Buddhist Monks in Myanmar, who in 2019 used terror tactics on innocent Rohingya Muslims. The conflicting ideas of preaching peace and serenity whilst being openly violent symbolises the religious tensions of today. My tonal palette and print were inspired by traditional zen gardens, formed by creating strokes in sand referencing movement and tranquillity. The range is geared towards the Men’s contemporary streetwear market level featuring a mixture of sportswear inspired casual tailoring.

Sustainability

Stephanie Parsons

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

Not My Problem” investigates and raises awareness of the effect climate change is having on the UK and therefore our everyday lives; this is in hope the collection will educate and inspire consumers towards change. Sustainability is key in this collection, the natural or second-hand sourced fabrics ensure the sustainability of production; while techniques such as design for recycling, disassembly and reuse ensure responsible disposal. The concept is communicated using silhouette, tonal colour and imagery including print and knit; of which are focused within each outfit to represent a different effect climate change is having: Flood, Heatwave, Erosion, and Drought.

Lucy Sankey

University of Derby
BA Textile Design

My work crosses the boundary between art and fashion, using simple screen print techniques to produce stand out fabrics that can be worn or hung on the wall.

Hand cut paper stencils, water-based printing inks and organic or waste fabrics mean the artworks are as sustainable as possible by reducing electric, chemical and water waste. Wall hangings are zero waste and use reclaimed materials to hang. Designed around longevity and minimal waste, dresses are designed from full pieces of cloth, strengthened with the printing ink itself, with any sample pieces used for accessories such as face masks.

Sara Pound

De Montfort University
BA Contour Fashion

Morphology is my project inspired by the delicate forms and fluidity of mushrooms, focusing on the structural aspects of fungi to support the designs and fabrication. My digital embroidery designs are informed by a responsible approach to consumption, especially through the fabrication of design. The dress, made from a pleated tulle fabric, allows the garment to expand and contract to fit multiple sizes, while the boxy shape ensures simplicity in the way it is cut. Conscious of preventing further wastage, intricate design features were created using excess fabric, with the mesh sourced from a local deadstock fabric supplier.

Susanna Raiskio

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Textile Design

Aim of the project was to tackle the current textile waste problem with investigating chemical fibre-to-fibre recycling. In chemical recycling, pre-used textiles are chemically converted into new virgin-equivalent quality fibres, which then can be used in new yarns and textiles. The process enables a circular material resource.

My starting point was to convert a classic, unisex, white T-shirt made from 100% hemp. Hemp fibres are strong and durable, and the environmental impacts of the hemp are lower compared to cotton and polyester. At the end of its life, the material is shredded, dissolved and spun into new Ioncell ® fibres.

Karolina Najdek

University of Northampton
Fashion

New Horizons is inspired by space exploration, from first sputnik satellite to plans to for mars colonisation. I am fascinated by all those pioneers who are willing to venture into uncharted territories and face new challenges in order to drive humanity forward.

At present fashion is experiencing a leap towards digital design therefore I decided to explore cutting edge 3D prototyping software. This enabled me to resolve all design and technical challenges before I cut any fabric, significantly reducing amount of paper and calico compared with my process before. I believe this is a one small step that fashion designers should take to save our beautiful planet.

Amy White

University of Northampton
BA Fashion

My collection draws influences from the tea making ceremony of Japan. Taking inspiration from the art form, my collection allows for space, time and reflection which supports this special Japanese ceremony.

To me, sustainable fashion should be the norm. As part of the development, I have produced materials grown from green tea, by religiously testing and caring for this material. The technique has been developed to produce beautifully hand-crafted materials inspired by the ground-breaking work of Suzanne Lee.

‘Bacterial Cellulose’ – the fabric which I have produced for this collection – is 100% biodegradable and 100% compostable. To compliment the Bacterial Cellulose, I’ve used 100% natural materials that will decompose alongside the home-grown fabric. My vision was to create a collection that could be fully composted along-side general food waste once it was no longer needed. In addition, I have incorpo-rated zero-waste pattern cutting techniques, such as folding, that have been in-spired by Japanese origami folding. This produces no waste textile and embeds the collection in the circular supply chain.

I want to be a sustainable designer because I believe that sustainability is the fu-ture of fashion and is the way to develop the industry to keep it succeeding and inspiring.

Henry McCready

Nottingham Trent University
BA Fashion Design

Awareness of male mental health from childhood freedom, fighting pressures that arise; restrictions of adulthood can lead to failure or being unable to cope.

Sourcing studio and mill scraps; using creative pattern cutting minimized waste. Combining cutting and manufacturing stages together, patchworking off-cuts to be incorporated later. My approach questioned sustainability, using scraps and reducing landfill. Unusable became usable and promoted British material therefore reducing the carbon footprint. Interest in craft and community. Raw materials of British ateliers, patchworking and hand finishing. Collaboration with a hand knitter.

Sustainability was key; toiles from scraps, left-over buttons, patchworking and incorporating material markings.

Hannah Potter

Nottingham Trent University
Textiles Design BA Hons

S-He| A unisex textile collection blurring the lines between gender, inspired by movement and reflection within architectural structures. Featuring jacquard and dobby woven fabrics for oversized streetwear, it is designed to encourage confidence and bravery, making a statement through bright colour and bold pattern; dynamic designs to empower and energise.

The collection aims to enhance wellbeing by encouraging self-expression without limitations, with bold colour and comforting textures. Season-less, unique and interchangeable between genders, these are clothes to cherish for longer or swap for adaptability, to reduce the need to consume more.

Textile Design

Sophia Brown

University of Derby
Textile Design

I have entered garments from my recent collection Nature’s Autograph, exploring the natural form and growth of Earth’s creations through an abstract lens. This focused mainly on pattern clash for womenswear.

1: Hendrix Duster Coat, inspired by crystal textures and heavily influenced by Dries Van Noten’s 2019 Pre-Collection. The coat is made with heavyweight jacquard woven fabrics using both acrylic and cotton yarns, the coat shows bound seams for a perfect finish.

2: Elton Jacket, printed textiles of other worldly florals and abstract leopard print. Made with herringbone tweed and bound seams. This jacket explores androgyny and patterns clash together.

Rachel Lawrence

University of Derby
Textile Design

Mod-ify is a collection inspired by the style and music of the Mod movement and uses a combination of hand and digital techniques to produce unique fabrics and fashion pieces.

The blazer, inspired by Mod revival band, The Jam, uses laser cut strips combined with hand dyed Shibori and digital sublimation print. The shirt picks up on a boating blazer, which has a strong connection to the Mod identity, but distorts the traditional garment by overlaying a section of it onto a printed shirt. Further outfits within the collection use laser cutting, layered prints and twists on traditional pattern cutting.

Kira Allder

De Montfort University
BA Textile Design

Expressive Florals: Inspired by the organic imagery found during a research trip to the city of New York. Emphasising the bold and the graphic colours, this design has a particular hand and machine embroidered design capturing the essence of the visual research. The focus on heavily embellished florals, with dense stitching reflects the dynamic visual language of the street art found in the city. The design celebrates my love of manmade materials, using them that to emulate a sense of floral architecture. The embellished design was created to be used on a range of luxury handbags.

Leanne Sheasby

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Textile Design

You’re a Mess. Inspiration comes from shapes and mixed patterns captured through the form of photography. Creating photoshoots incorporating comedic poses and unusual ways of wearing clothing. Juxtaposing this with the random, the misplaced and forgotten objects in our environment. The imagery collected then contributed to a variety of artworks ranging from paintings and drawings, as well as layered collaging. Construction of models built up of reinvented design elements developed a more considered reinterpretation and material manipulation. Creating bold and colourful graphic designs through screen printing, hand cut leather and layered materials.

Jazmin Hadhazi-Iosif

University of Northampton
Textiles for Fashion

My concept is called Vintage Dreams and it is based of my childhood memories and the memories of my maternal great-grandmothers and my mum. It’s an amalgamation of the romance book ‘Anne of the Island’ from LM Montgomery, my favour book as a child, and my Hungarian heritage and craft work which I have learned from my mother and greatgrandmothers. Each element of my collection is symbolic to a memory; such as the colours of the sunset from the books and the Hungarian folk motifs. When I was little I always wanted to live in an era my great-grandmothers lived in and liked to pretend that I did which is where the title came from.

Stira Ibrahim

University of Northampton
Textiles for fashion

Concept is inspired by multicultural children. It explores senses of identity and belonging and how this affects their social wellbeing. This is a children’s wear collection with a strong drive towards sustainability. Extensive research was carried out into the traditional natural dyeing techniques related to Kurdish-Syrian heritage. Sage, Camomile, Hibiscus, Indigo, Cochineal and Madder, were used for colour and Alum as mordant to fix it . Exploration into mixing ingredients resulted in a wide range of vivid colours on a variety of natural fibres to include wool and cotton. Hand dyeing using tie-dye technique allowed to create unique patterns and free hand applique embroidery inspired by a photo of my daughter who is both British – Kurdish used to obtain interesting textures. All threads were used 100% cotton and were naturally dyed.

Georgia Hill

Nottingham Trent University
Textile Design

Power Play is a knitted textile future-facing collection that aims to improve the future of design. With life at its most uncertain, often extremely fast-paced, people have a tendency to over-look their mental health and well-being. My collection set’s out to boost the empowering positivity in people’s lives, both mentally and physically. By using high-quality functional yarns and fabrics with performance and tactile qualities, I have fostered an authentic relationship with the customer, instantly connecting with the garment/fabric. Through creating a vibrant sports aesthetic enhancing emotions such as pleasure, joy, optimism, confidence and balance, often felt through exercise. Initiating a positive, mood boosting response, consumers will connect more with meaningful clothing choices rather than consumption through fast fashion.

Tabby Lazenbury

Nottingham Trent University
BA(Hons) Textile Design

Transform explores folded geometric structures that can expand, contract and flex to form sculptural and adaptable textiles. My concept developed from time spent working alongside apparel designers at ‘Speedo’ and has been inspired by origami, architecture and innovative material technologies. These dynamic sportswear pieces showcase engineered ‘trompe l’oile’ prints and digital embroideries manipulated to enhance the body. Led by the need for safety when running, cycling and training outdoors, these pieces include reflective elements for visibility along with padded protection systems and laser cut ventilation adding to the functionality, flexibility and strength of my collection. Fold, flex, expand, reflect, transform.

Womenswear Design

Julienne Krause

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

TUSCAN SUMMER is a Spring/Summer 20/21 womenswear collection. Made up of five separate Outfits, including dresses, shirts, trousers, belts, scarves, a bodysuit, and a coat. The reference to Tuscany is seen in the print and embossing patterns, which were inspired by the landscape and hand-painted ceramics. The designs of this collection are very playful and voluminous. The collection intends that the customer feels comfortable, beautiful, and peaceful. Connecting the everyday life with fun, beautiful, and colourful garments, inspired by Tuscany to change the mood and wellbeing of people who wear the clothing in their regular environment.

Brooke Woolley

University of Derby
BA (Hons) Fashion

‘COLLECTION XX-XX’, is inspired by a love for contemporary art. I admire creatives that utilise vibrant colours, bold prints and iconography. During the design process I have mirrored these strong shapes and tones within my work. Scuba and neoprene fabrics offer vibrance while providing a structural approach to garment making. Varying weights of jersey intersperse the heavy neoprene to give a balanced approach to the collection, offering a juxtaposition between drape and definition. I have also incorporated digital sublimation and hand screen printing methods along with laser cutting techniques to achieve my desired line-up.

Humaira Daud

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Design

‘From Junk to Art: Trash to Treasure’ tells the story of second hand and impaired garments being exquisitely transformed into something to cherish. This outfit was created by repurposing once-loved garments from charity shops. Recent world events have allowed us to appreciate the beauty of the environment: we have time to reflect and grow more aware of the need to take care of ourselves and our world. This collection celebrates and beautifies waste. The aftermath of a bonfire becomes a photoshoot setting showing how the marvelous can be created from neglect.

Hannah Strike

De Montfort University
BA Fashion Design

‘Onme Triumph Perfectum’ meaning ‘everything that comes in threes is perfect’, is a Latin quote which inspired my research into things that come in threes. The ‘Strike a Pose’ womenswear collection is a personal exploration of the Strike family and my role as one of three Strike sisters. Each sister’s personality, individual style and hobbies were used as the stimulus for this work. The collection offers a combination of knitwear and woven garments, focusing on the innovative manufacturing technique of fusing neoprene and knitwear together to create a new structured fabric.

Konrad Jankowiak

University of Northampton
BA Fashion

My name is Konrad Aleksander Jankowiak as a designer, I stand for fun, equality and unity. I want to make a statement and talk about problems that need to be addressed and solved. My collection is about “this” different people of our society like the LGBTQ community or immigrants. Through my concept, I want to show that they shouldn’t be described as “different” but as “extraordinary”. For my final major project, I’ve decided to create a contemporary collection with a range of creative shapes and silhouettes that are being complimented by interesting colour pallet with a different shade of purple, pink, blue and metallics. For my fabrics, I’ve decided to work with a wide rage that consisted of PVC, latex, silk polyester and scuba.

Amy White

University of Northampton
BA Fashion

My collection draws influences from the tea making ceremony of Japan. Taking inspiration from the art form, my collection allows for space, time and reflection which supports this special Japanese ceremony.

To me, sustainable fashion should be the norm. As part of the development, I have produced materials grown from green tea, by religiously testing and caring for this material. The technique has been developed to produce beautifully hand-crafted materials inspired by the ground-breaking work of Suzanne Lee.

‘Bacterial Cellulose’ – the fabric which I have produced for this collection – is 100% biodegradable and 100% compostable. To compliment the Bacterial Cellulose, I’ve used 100% natural materials that will decompose alongside the home-grown fabric. My vision was to create a collection that could be fully composted along-side general food waste once it was no longer needed. In addition, I have incorpo-rated zero-waste pattern cutting techniques, such as folding, that have been in-spired by Japanese origami folding. This produces no waste textile and embeds the collection in the circular supply chain.

I want to be a sustainable designer because I believe that sustainability is the fu-ture of fashion and is the way to develop the industry to keep it succeeding and inspiring.

Lily Moore

Nottingham Trent University
BA Fashion Design

Polly Nor’s exhibition ‘Airing my dirty laundry’ was the inspiration for my collection. The themes she highlights in her work, have resonated with me, and have inspired my collection by looking at women and their 21st century demons regarding insecurities with body image, expectations in society and how we are slaves to social media and the pressures it brings.

Starting again with a blank canvas and shedding one’s skin, are symbolised by the woman wearing the skin coloured Morph suit.

Ciara Pontin

Nottingham Trent University
BA Fashion Design

Does your (grand)mother come from Ireland? ‘Anyone who lives in a folklore area, no matter what his subsequent impingements, is very much shaped by that background of living’ – Ernie O’Malley

My concept was sparked by a visit to my Nan’s home in Buckinghamshire.

Although my Nan had immigrated to England from Ireland in 1956, I noticed how she had decorated her home with a strong reference to her rural Irish upbringing in the ornaments, paintings and furnishings she displayed in her home.

My concept developed through exploring her heritage and identity. I picked up on Irish tartans, lace, and colour which I explored through textile prints.

Nominees
Kira Allder
1%
197
Hollie Brown
0%
18
Sophia Brown
0%
60
Katherine Channell
1%
260
Heemin Choi
0%
4
Katie Cornock
0%
117
Janine Curcher
1%
256
Humaira Daud
1%
222
Hannah Davies
0%
84
Felicity Dodson
1%
138
Erin Doyle
1%
278
Oluwanifemi Duyilemi
5%
1430
Lydia Fisher
0%
41
Catherine Fletcher
0%
29
Clarissa Fritsch
0%
11
Jazmin Hadhazi-Iosif
0%
4
Abi Harris
1%
259
Simon Hazell
0%
84
Georgia Hill
0%
123
Stira Ibrahim
33%
8600
Elvira Isenzhulova
0%
48
Moritz Jahn
0%
5
Konrad Jankowiak
0%
96
Maddie Johnson
2%
414
Amber Jones
1%
137
Georgina Knight
0%
110
Julienne Krause
0%
33
Tabby Lazenbury
2%
483
Rachel Lawrence
0%
45
Abi Lewer
1%
203
Marium Mahmood
0%
56
Henry McCready
0%
6
Anna Melegh
0%
30
Ashira Mellor
2%
542
Emily Moody
1%
191
Lily Moore
0%
2
Karolina Najdek
0%
31
Han Park
0%
5
Stephanie Parsons
0%
99
George Paul
1%
139
Ciara Pontin
0%
5
Hannah Potter
0%
126
Sara Pound
0%
57
Saskia Purr
0%
8
Susanna Raiskio
0%
41
Madison Raynor
0%
41
Lucy Sankey
0%
8
Leanne Sheasby
0%
29
Halima Shigdar
0%
62
Lauren Smith
0%
32
Nicole Stavrou
36%
9335
Hannah Strike
2%
417
Nicole Szlavik
1%
133
Rebekah Theobald-Brown
0%
114
Maisie Thompson
0%
95
Elizabeth Walecki
1%
358
Rosie Wells
1%
167
Amy White
0%
96
Brooke Woolley
0%
99